Winter a time for fun in Palliser-Bayview-Pump Hill

The Palliser, Bayview and Pump Hill communities held a winter festival in their community centres, with people from the areas celebrating with various activities on Feb. 8.

The event was a chance for residents to enjoy the cold weather with ice skating, face painting and other family-friendly activities.

“It’s a family-friendly event, and it’s a winter festival,” said SAIT graduate Daniel Sun.

“There’s an ice rink at the school park, so you can go skating.”

Because of the small size of the three communities, they work together and with other associations and with groups like Shaolin Wushu Canada, to make the event happen.

“This is a good time,” said above association’s member and PBP volunteer Justin McCutcheon, “to promote our martial arts association, Shaolin Wushu Canada and to just get out and meet people in the community.”

Alongside McCutcheon was  Chin Hock Tan, his instructor and owner of Shaolin Wushu Canada.

“I see a lot of people coming,” said Tan, “and I see that they are interested in what is going on in the community, so that’s nice to see.

“I’m retired, and I’m a martial arts teacher, and it’s been my passion for the last 50 years.”

“I also run a martial arts school and teach them such as Tai Chi and Qigong.”

Area city councillor Brian Pincott was among those out for the festival.

“This is all about people,” Pincott said.

“I have three of these winter festivals today, so I’m hoping that I actually get to use my skates at one of them.”

“I’ve got Marda Loop and Britannia to visit, and tomorrow I’ve got CKE, which is Chinook Park, Kelvin Grove and Eagle Ridge, which are all also doing winter events.”

The president of PBP Community, Tracee Collins, also took her time to enjoy the festivities and interacted with all of the visitors.

“I am a mother of two children, where one is seven and the other is nine years old,” said Collins.

“I’m American, and I moved to Calgary five years ago. I discovered a whole new way of how services are being offered in neighborhoods through these communities.

“They are not at all like American concepts, because these services are usually provided by paid employees of a city or town in the United States,” said Collins.

“I got involved in our community very quickly, and now my position as a president takes a lot of my time.

“Our community is very outdoors-oriented, and people here are very happy to help out. It’s also very family-oriented, and we have many seniors here as well.”

Winter Fun: Tracee Collins, president of the PBP Community Association and Lotte Dankelman with the pink shirt enjoy their time at the Winterfest. (Photo by Leo Aragon/The Press)
Winter Fun: Tracee Collins, president of the PBP Community Association and Lotte Dankelman with the pink shirt enjoy their time at the Winterfest. (Photo by Leo Aragon/The Press)
About Leo Aragon 10 Articles
As a writing and communications major in the journalism program at SAIT, Leo Aragon worked as a reporter for The Press during the 2013-2014 academic year.

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