Accommodation issues a challenge for Calgary students

With the recent flood situation and an increase in apartment rentals, some students from across the city of Calgary are having trouble finding a place to live.

Kenneth Taylor, VP External at SAIT Students’ Association (SAITSA), said while the situation has not improved for many students, it is not getting worse either.

[pullquote]There has been a considerable loss in suites after the flood, and there’s no way we can just re-materialize new suites and apartments.[/pullquote]

“There has been a considerable loss in suites after the flood, and there’s no way we can just re-materialize new suites and apartments,” said Taylor.

However, recently within SAIT Residence there have been new opportunities and vacancies, these are tiny steps towards the improvement of the situation.

According to Taylor, while SAIT Residence has been helpful in trying to spread the word of every vacancy to the students, their prices and deadlines might not fit within every student’s budget.

With rates based on the location of both the residence buildings and a strict payment deadline to follow, many students relying on student loans may find it hard to keep up with, Taylor said.

VP External at University of Calgary Students’ Union (SU), Conner Brown, said the difficulty in finding proper housing isn’t anything out of the ordinary for U of C students.

“The flood hasn’t affected our university as much, and only a handful of students have approached us,” said Brown.

[pullquote align=”right”]I would encourage students to take a look at the off-campus housing website, and get in touch with landlords in the area.[/pullquote]

“I would encourage students to take a look at the off-campus housing website, and get in touch with landlords in the area.”

In Brown’s opinion, there are different facets in terms of pricing between on-campus and off-campus housing at U of C.

For students who choose to live on the university campus, there is an expectation for the rent to be paid every eight months, Brown shared, thus giving them the opportunity to spend the rest of the four months at home or out of town.

Contrarily, the students who live off-campus have to pay up for a year, which leads to a higher rent altogether, Brown said.

First year environmental management student at U of C, Sally Branston, said she has been facing a considerable amount of trouble in finding her own place since the month of July.

Having moved to Calgary from B.C. two months before her classes were scheduled to begin, Branston said she did not come prepared to pay for anything on the higher end.

“I’m currently staying with a friend because I haven’t been able to find something within a lower price range over the past two months,” said Branston.

According to Taylor, SAIT students have been affected by this scenario by renting out apartments that cost them $100 to $150 more than they expect to be paying.

In a recent poll, Taylor explained, statistics showed 200 to 300 students still currently on the lookout for accommodations.

“We would recommend more students to come forward and tell us if they have any issues so that we may help them in any way we can,” said Taylor.

About Yashica Anandani 11 Articles
As a writing and communications major in the journalism program at SAIT, Yashica Anandani worked as a reporter for The Press during the 2013-2014 academic year.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*