Hundreds fill the rows at the Field of Crosses for Remembrance Day

Thousands of Calgarians left their warm homes behind on Monday, Nov. 11 to attend one of the many Remembrance Day ceremonies that took place.

Most notably were the ceremonies that took place at the Jubilee Auditorium and the Military Museum. Both were packed, and some attendees at the museum’s ceremony had no choice but to park along Crowchild Trail S.W.

The ceremony at the Field of Crosses on Memorial Drive N.W. between Centre Street and 3rd Street was also well attended, with an estimated  300 people on hand.

Many arrived early to walk to admire the rows of approximately 3,000 crosses planted on display. When the project began five years ago, there were only roughly 500 crosses.

Calgary cadets joined the crowd, led by commanding officer Dan Barnfield, who is also a student resource co-ordinator at the Alberta College of Art and Design (ACAD).

Fifth-year cadet, Robert Stange, was attending the ceremony at the Field of Crosses for his second year.

“I’ve had a great time with the program so far,” said Stange. “I’ve been shipped all over Canada.”

His mother, Captain Jamilynn Stange, was also in attendance at the ceremony.

“[The cadets] help the Legions sell poppies all around the city,” said Capt. Stange. “They’re usually quite busy this time of year.

“Plus a lot of the schools help encourage the cadets to wear their uniforms and help with their Remembrance Day celebrations as well.”

The ceremony was rung in at 10:50 a.m. by elementary students from Sunnyside School singing O Canada in English and French.

They were followed by a reading of John McCrae’s famous poem, ‘In Flanders Fields,’ done by Murray McCann, member of The McCann Family Foundation that funds the Field of Crosses. He was accompanied by his grandson, Noah McDonough.

At the end of the ceremony, four wreaths were laid beneath the half-mast flag in front of the cross of an unknown soldier.

One wreath was displayed in honour of the Canadian Legacy Project, a non-profit foundation in support of disadvantaged youth, seniors and veterans, by 4-year-old Molly Howard and her father, Dave Howard, the president of the Canadian Legacy Project.

A Generation of Remembrance: Dave Howard (left) and his daughter, 4-year-old Molly Howard, lay a wreath in honour of the Canadian Legacy Project. Howard is the president of the project, which supports disadvantaged youth, seniors and veterans nationwide.
A Generation of Remembrance: Dave Howard, left, and his daughter, 4-year-old Molly Howard, lay a wreath in honour of the Canadian Legacy Project. Howard is the president of the project, which supports disadvantaged youth, seniors and veterans nationwide. (Photo by Monica Henderson/The Press)
About Monica Henderson 5 Articles
As a writing and communications major in the journalism program at SAIT, Monica Henderson worked as a reporter for The Press during the 2013-2014 academic year.

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