Carvers stand on ‘gourd’ for Halloween spirit

People got into the Halloween spirit at the SAIT Student Association’s (SAITSA) pumpkin carving contest at the Gateway on Oct. 30.

The event, which happens annually, encourages students, staff, and faculty to get together and have fun while showing off their carving talents.

Michael Bacodaco, a Gateway employee, has only carved pumpkins twice in his life.

“The best part of carving pumpkins is taking out the gooey stuff,” he said.

“It’s nasty.”

Israel Maya, a first year business student, is also fairly new to carving jack-o-lanterns.

He heard about the event at the student support centre, and knew he “definitely had to go.”

“I’m Mexican so this is my first pumpkin,” he said.

“My favourite part of carving a pumpkin is shaping and cutting it.”

Blake McLeod, an Alberta College of Art and Design student, works at the Odyssey and “kept hearing about the contest.”

Several pumpkins decorated the coffee shop, and the event “seemed to be a big thing.”

“Carving pumpkins is a good tradition,” she said.

“It just kinda keeps it [Halloween] alive, and keeps up the excitement from when you were a kid.”

McLeod said she enjoyed scooping out the “guts” of her pumpkin more than anything else.

“It is nice to make it all empty and smooth, although I never know what to carve.”

“It’s like, ‘here is a dumb face,’” she said.

Erin Anderson, a first year journalism student, disagreed with McLoed and said scraping out the insides is definitely her least favourite aspect of carving pumpkins.

Despite that, she said she “tries to carve pumpkins every year.”

Although the contest was all in good fun, participants could not help but notice their competition carving pumpkins around them.

“There is a guy over there who is getting really serious,” said Anderson, while gesturing at Maya.

“He looks pretty good.”

Bacodaco said the event was just “a lot of fun,” and was not too serious about competing, but he was very impressed with his boss’s, Sarah Haven’s, pumpkins.

“I think she [my boss] is showing off and making us look bad,” he said.

Samar Hartil, a first-year business student, said her “competition is pretty fierce and stiff.”

Maya, on the other hand, was not concerned with the other carvers at all.

“As for winning the competition, I don’t know, I’ll just try my best.”

Deep concentration: Israel Maya, a first year business student, works on carving a Mexican skull into his pumpkin at the Gateway at SAIT in Calgary on Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. Maya is from Mexico and had never carved a pumpkin before. (Photo by Angela Brown/The Press)
Deep concentration: Israel Maya, a first year business student, works on carving a Mexican skull into his pumpkin at the Gateway at SAIT in Calgary on Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. Maya is from Mexico and had never carved a pumpkin before. (Photo by Angela Brown/The Press)
About Angela Brown 6 Articles
As a writing and communications major in the journalism program at SAIT, Angela Brown is working as a reporter for The Press during the 2014-2015 academic year.