Spot-a-Dog helps hounds find forever homes

The dog days of summer were winding down as local adoption agencies joined forces to find new homes for dogs on Sept. 17 at Willow Park Village.

Agencies such as Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF), Calgary Humane Society, Spot Walk, Alberta Dachshund Rescue and Boston Terrier Rescue came together to help raise awareness, as well as find forever homes for shelter animals.

“Our main goal for today is to increase empathy and awareness for these animals,” said Philip Fulton, manager of community outreach at the Calgary Humane Society.

“Every day is different, we never know what hoarding cases or surrenderings we’re going to get that day.”

Fulton said that the Calgary Humane Society takes in 700 to 7,000 animals a year.

“There’s the preconceived notion that these animals have been abused, or are damaged goods, but every animal is different,” said Fulton.

Fulton said that if people can’t adopt an animal but still want to support these agencies, they should donate money, volunteer or even show public support.

A Different Kind of Cookie:Cookie poses happily with her flower collar at the Spot a Dog Adoption Drive held at Willow Park Village in Calgary on Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. The drive was an effort to raise awareness for shelter dogs as well as to find animals a forever home. (Photo by Magda Ghebru/The Press)
A Different Kind of Cookie: Cookie poses happily with her flower collar at the Spot-a-Dog Adoption Drive, held at Willow Park Village in Calgary on Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. The drive was an effort to raise awareness for shelter dogs, as well as to find animals a forever home. (Photo by Magda Ghebru/The Press)

“More people should care more.”

Although citizens may not be as willing to donate money, John Minchin from Spot Walk supports other agencies with his own.

“We donate $1 per hour walked to the Calgary Humane Society, so we can do our part to contribute to these animals,” said Minchin.

Spot Walk is a private dog-walking agency that walks your dog for you, and is all-inclusive through their mobile app.

There’s the preconceived notion that these animals have been abused or are damaged goods, but every animal is different. – Philip Fulton

Minchin said that events like these are usually held by one specific agency, but it’s a nice surprise to see multiple agencies together supporting one another.

“We usually don’t do this kind of get-together but there’s been a great turnout,” said Minchin.

The event ran from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., which included a continuous tussle between dogs, a mini-cart race with the dachshunds and loving puppy cuddles.

About Magda Ghebru 3 Articles
As a writing and communications major in the journalism program at SAIT, Magda Ghebru is working as a reporter for The Press during the 2016-17 academic year.