Bring your lunch, or buy food on campus: The student’s dilemma

Lunchtimes on SAIT campus are busy, with equally long line-ups of students for microwaves, and restaurants.

Of course, there are some drawbacks to having to pack food every morning, but there are also advantages.

“I started bringing lunch to school because of the money I was spending each week, and I wanted something healthier,” said Joanne Thompson, a second-year business administration student.

Thompson says she was spending around $30 per week on lunches alone, not including early morning coffee runs.

“I was beginning to turn into a broke student,” said Thompson.

Thompson packs lunches the night before, so she doesn’t have to worry about it the next morning.

“I use leftovers from supper, so it’s just easier that way,” said Thompson.

Michael Ray, a first-year baking and pastry arts student, prefers to bring his own lunch because of the line-ups at food outlets on campus.

“I walk past Tim Hortons and there’s a line going down the hall, and I’m like ‘nope,’” said Ray.

The only thing Ray would like to change is the number of microwaves available to students.

“The wait for a microwave is pretty insane,” said Ray. “I personally would like SAIT to buy more and put them in Stan Grad.”

Ray still buys food occasionally, as it is often hard to remember to bring lunch every day.

“I try and remember, but sometimes when I have an early class and when I’m rushing I just don’t remember,” said Ray.

“Last year, when I was buying lunch, I was really disappointed with what was offered,” said Thompson.

Thompson doesn’t think there are enough healthy options on campus, which helped her decide to bring food from home.

“Most of it is overpriced junk food,” said Thompson of the food offerings at school.

For students with dietary restrictions, like those with celiac disease or vegan diets, it is hard to find meals suited to their needs.

Martin Smith is a first-year Film and Video Production student with a severe gluten allergy. He doesn’t trust the food vendors on SAIT to have safe options.

“There are gluten-free options, such as at the Odyssey (in Campus Centre), but I don’t know if during the food prep they keep everything separate,” said Smith.

Smith has gotten sick once during the school year from unsafe food preparation, and prefers his own lunches.

“I just trust to have my own food, and it’s also a lot cheaper to do it this way,” said Smith.

Yummy TimeStudents use the microwaves in Senator Burns on SAIT campus in Calgary to warm up their lunches on November 29 2016. Students prefer to bring lunch from home to save money, for a healthier option and because SAIT doesn't have enough dietary options. (Photo by Brianna Brost/The Press)
Yummy Time: Students use the microwaves in Senator Burns on SAIT campus in Calgary to warm up their lunches on Nov. 29, 2016. Some students prefer to bring lunch from home to save money, for a healthier choice, or because SAIT doesn’t have enough dietary options. (Photo by Brianna Brost/The Press)
About Brianna Brost 5 Articles
As a writing and communications major in the journalism program at SAIT, Brianna Brost is working as a reporter for The Press during the 2016-17 academic year.

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